Marilyn Manson – We Are Chaos

In the summer of 2019, I attended an in store performance at a famous record store in West Seattle. The artist was someone who had deep roots in the early 80’s Seattle punk scene but eventually made his name with a notorious hard rock band out of Los Angeles, CA. This artist once again was living in West Seattle and had become sort of a prodigal son when he wasn’t on the road reunited with the band who had made him famous. It was cool to meet Duff McKagan. The show had a country vibe with a few Guns N Roses classics in the setlist. But one of my takeaways from that evening was how cool his collaborator was. Shooter Jennings was like talking to an old friend. Personable, nice, and in pre-COVID days, willing to shake my hand. I also forgot to get a picture with Shooter – a big regret. Shooter Jennings – you may have heard – is a performer, co-writer, and producer on Marilyn Manson’s new album, We Are Chaos.

Straight up – I’m not a huge Marilyn Manson fan. The early albums felt like unfocused rage to me. A brief dalliance with a Bowie allegiance caught my ears – indeed, I still listen to 1998’s Mechanical Animals 22 years later. After that? It is very hit or miss for me. My interest was triggered in recent years by his cover of God’s Gonna Cut You Down – a posthumous song released by Johnny Cash. The new Marilyn Manson songs seemed seeped in country and blues, yet still had that old rage. When I heard Shooter Jennings was involved with the new album, I knew I had to have a copy. It doesn’t disappoint – this is easily my favorite Marilyn Manson album. Your mileage may vary, to be sure. But what I like about it is that it takes just about every sound he has explored over the last 25+ years and blends it into an intoxicating brew. Industrial, new wave, country, blues – there is even some crooning on this record.

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Sonny Lanegan – No Questions

I’m going to say something that may not be the most popular thing to say – The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo soundtrack was way too long for me. I loved portions of it (especially the cover of Led Zeppelin’s “Immigrant Song”). But at times I found myself losing interest or reaching for the track forward button. I have enjoyed Trent Reznor’s soundtrack work and think it holds a specific spot in the Nine Inch Nails canon – but compared to Ghosts or The Social Network – The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo meandered where it should have concluded or ended where I had hoped it would meander. Not a disaster by any means, I just wish it had been cut in half (this all could be due to a short attention span, I admit).

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